Cooking Beyond Borders – Episode 2

27thAug – 30thAug

The second episode of “Cooking Beyond Borders” was spread over four-days in which 7 aspiring fellow bloggers from different parts of the world joined me in a journey where East meets West. We all explored and recreated some authentic and delicious Middle Eastern and South Asian dishes. Here is a brief overview of the eight classic recipes made during this virtual food travel. Check their websites and Instagram blog posts for the complete recipes. 

Cooking beyond borders in now in collaboration with @chilitochoc as she has been an integral part of planning and executing this collaborative series. 

Shalima (@shalimaskitchen) made Boal Mass Curry. She took us on a trip to her roots, as the saying goes “Mache baathe Bangali” which means “Us Bengali’s are known for our fish and rice”. Boal is a Cat fish, which is full of flavor when caught fresh and cooked fresh. Shalima made this drooling fish curry, which I would categorize as a perfect comfort food. 
Suyammah (@foodboothweb) made Beyti Kebap. This Turkish delicacy is full of colors and is vibrantly flavored. Beyti Kebab is a dish consisting of ground beef or lamb, grilled on a skewer and served wrapped in dough and topped with tomato sauce and yogurt. 
Batool (@spoonsofflavorbybatool) made Shish Tawook or Shish Taouk. It is a traditional Middle Eastern chicken dish. These grilled chicken skewers are incredibly popular in Lebanon. Lemon, garlic and yogurt are the key ingredients for these succulent and incredibly juicy skewers.It is most commonly served as a pita ‘sandwich’ with a creamy garlic paste called toum (like an aioli or garlic mayo) and tomatoes.
I, Fatima (@potsncurries) made Malaysian Chicken Satay. Extremely popular street food in Malaysia. Chicken satays have three main components: a flavorful chicken marinade; a good charcoal grill; and nutty peanut dipping sauce. These are traditionally served with cucumbers, red onions and rice cakes. After making and eating them, I can say no one can eat just one.
Asma (@a_tale_of sauce_and spice) made Masala Dosa. A dosa is a cooked flat thin-layered rice batter, originating from the Indian subcontinent. It is made from a fermented batter. It is somewhat similar to a crepe in appearance. Traditionally, dosas are served hot along with sambar, a stuffing of potatoes, and chutney. An extremely delicious vegetarian street food.
Walla (@walla_abueid) made Ouzi Sorar. The word “surar” is Arabic for pouches, which is exactly what this dish is about. Ouzi means a dish made with baked lamb and spiced rice. Meat is prepared with special blend of sweet spices, including allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and cardamom. To prepare ouzi sorar, chicken/Lamb ground meat and rice are encapsulated in a dome of pastry dough which is baked until beautifully crunchy and crisp. It is served with cucumber yogurt or a green salad.
Qashang (@chilitochoc) made Persian Joojeh Kebabs. A popular Iranian dish in which boneless chunks of chicken are prepared in a marinade of yogurt with tangy lemon juice and fragrant crushed saffron. These chicken skewers can be served with Saffron Rice and a Persian Cucumber & Tomato Salad.⁠
Fatima (@f.f.ammis.kitchen) made Chicken Karahi. It is one of the most famous Pakistani curry that you will savor till the very last bite. Extremely aromatic and tasty curry made with tomatoes, green chilies and freshly grounded spices. Every region has its own version of this authentic Pakistani dish. Some like to make it with onions and some without onions. It makes a perfect combo with a hot fluffy Naan.

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